Category Archives: Uncategorized

Glitterbug Gel or Potion? That is the question . . .

Good handwashing technique is paramount to infection prevention. Most adults would likely say they know how to wash their hands; after all, it’s something they’ve been doing since childhood. Many might be surprised, however, to find out how much residue can be left on their skin after a routine washing. And though it can feel awkward to think about having to learn how to wash your hands—especially as an adult—doing so can make a world of difference in preventing the spread of germs.

Handwashing
GlitterBug Gel and GlitterBug Potion are excellent products to aid in teaching proper hand hygiene to kids and adults alike. Both are intended to show how effective your current hand-cleaning methods are, and in turn, both products teach better techniques for hand-washing.

 

If both products do the same thing, what are the differences between the two? And which do you need?

 

A main difference can be found in the name of the products. GlitterBug Gel is just that: a gel. It is not a sanitizer and won’t kill germs, but it feels like a sanitizer. GlitterBug Potion is a hand lotion with a special UV fluorescent powder mixed in to show which part of your hands need a little more cleaning.

 

Which product you need depends on how you’re cleaning your hands. If you mainly use hand sanitizer, you should use GlitterBug Gel. If you usually wash with soap and water, GlitterBug Potion is for you.
Whichever way you wash your hands, a refresher on how you’re doing is a great way to learn how to be better in preventing the spread of germs.

Infection Prevention and Your Cat?

 

cat_rat

We all know one of the most effective ways to stop the spreading of infections is proper hand hygiene. In certain scenarios, however, particularly in big cities, deterring the spread of germs and disease requires other creative solutions.

 

It’s well known that rats are detrimental to public health. They carry E.coli and C.diff, antibiotic-resistant diseases transmitted to humans through direct contact, such as a rat’s bite. But you don’t have to have up-close interaction with a rat to be vulnerable to their dangers: disease is spread through their urine, feces, and fur (and rats shed a lot).

 

Cities like Chicago and Vancouver have endured such a massive infestation, rodent task forces have been put in place, with accompanying public awareness campaigns. Residents and business owners have tried to eliminate rats by using methods like traps, poison, and trenches, sometimes spending thousands of dollars on pest control attempts, all to no avail.

 

The most effective tool they’ve been able to find? Cats. That’s right, they’re not just good for internet videos: cats happen to be effective weapons in public health.

 

An animal shelter in Chicago called Tree House has contributed greatly to improving public health with their innovative idea of taking rescued cats who aren’t good candidates for adoption, and putting them to work. The Cats at Work project places colonies of cats where they’re needed most. The result is rat-free yards and buildings. With cats on the scene, rats– and diseases they carry– have been eradicated from residences and businesses alike.

 

As always keep washing your hands, but if you need more help, don’t be afraid to employ your cat.

 

Sources: http://edition.cnn.com/2016/07/15/health/cats-chicago-rat-patrol/index.html, http://www.cdc.gov/features/handwashing/

Image: https://pixabay.com/en/cat-animal-cat-portrait-cat-s-eyes-1508613/

Jimmy Kimmel and Guillermo: Learning the Correct Way to Wash Hands

Learning to wash your hands the right way is no laughing matter. Jimmy Kimmel wanted to make sure he was doing it right, so he reached out to Dr. Poland from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, who is a specialist in infectious disease.

Check the video out below, and then CLICK HERE to look at all the GLITTERBUG kits that can help ensure you are washing your hands correctly too!

Join the project that captures the good, the bad & the ugly of hand hygiene.

#handhygienx

Handwashing assist or foul? We all follow in the footsteps, handprints—and germs—of everyone who has gone before us. (Not to mention the stranger who is sitting next to us right now.)

Handwashing pundits know proper handwashing is the most effective way to kill those germs and prevent the spread of illness, so we’re launching a new project—a social, visual declaration to all of mankind that we MUST wash our hands: #handhygienx.

To encourage the handwashing-averse or neglectful public to get on board, we’re leveraging picture and video sharing on social media to collectively capture handwashing habits—be it assists or fouls—through the lens of the camera/phone-wielding public. This project isn’t just for infection control specialists, germophobes, or epidemiologists (although they’ll love it). It’s a campaign is for all of mankind; we humans who work, play, eat, shop, learn, touch, breathe, and live in the mire of life every day.

All things will be at play here, including (and hopefully) the good stuff. We’d love to see people washing their hands correctly or wearing gloves when appropriate; businesses that post encouraging handwashing signs; stores making disinfecting wipes readily available; maybe even videos of adults washing their hands while they sing the ABC song twice through (or the equivalent of the required 20-seconds it takes to kill germs). If it’s for the good of all mankind, share it.

The bad (unfortunately) will also be at play, from man-on-the street nose pickers to woman-on-the-street “free” sneezers. See a restaurant worker leaving the restroom without washing his or herhands? Capture it. Handwash hygienx will put a spotlight on all of the contaminators and cross-contaminators out there in society. You know who they are and it’s time to shame them.

The rules are SIMPLE: When you see a handwashing hygienx (good or foul), snap a picture with your mobile device and upload it to Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, or Google+ with the hashtag: #handhygienx. 

If you’re not a social media user, you’re welcome to email photos to saralynn@brevis.com and we’ll share it on our Brevis Instagram page and other social sites. We’ve added samples of hand hygienx photos to our official project page, and we’ll maintain a running collection as the project goes along.

Citizens of project #handhygienx unite! Help us spot the handwashing fair and foul, fight the germs, and live healthier lives all around on planet earth.